#IWSG – GENRES AND WRITING FOR PROFIT

Hello all! It’s the first Wednesday of the month and we know what that means:

IWSG-badgeIt’s time for another meeting of the Insecure Writers Support Group – #IWSG.

My hero, the amazing Ninja Captain Alex J. Cavanaugh founded this group and it has become a safe haven if you are an insecure writer.

Click the image if you would like to be a part of the #IWSG family. You won’t regret it.

Purpose: To share and encourage. Writers can express doubts and concerns without fear of appearing foolish or weak.

 

The awesome co-hosts for the February 7 posting of the IWSG are Stephen Tremp, Pat Garcia, Angela Wooldridge, Victoria Marie Lees, and Madeline Mora-Summonte!

So, I missed last month’s posting. Again. After being culled from the previous list I swore I wouldn’t miss any posts once I ‘re-upped’. I have work to do in that department. I let so many factors, like health and life, get in the middle of my blogging. I miss it terribly. I started this blog about a year and a half after my bleed and it was my lifeline. It was my sanity in an otherwise cruel (what I thought) existence. I ‘met’ so many wonderful people and formed great online friendships. I miss that so much. 

I’ll be writing a post on My Miracle Life at some point later this week about things that are going on. I see a light at the end of a long tunnel, but that’s another post.

I don’t want anyone to think I’ve forgotten about them because I haven’t. Just know I’ve missed you all.

February 7 question – What do you love about the genre you write in most often?   

That’s a tough question to answer since I enjoy all types of genres and always find myself dabbling in a variety. I haven’t written any stories or novels recently. I have my one novel that’s about 80% completed and in rough draft form and some unfinished short stories. Of course, the stories rejected in the past don’t count. I have a few of those. 😦

I have, however, been writing for a site that pays for my work. It’s not much, but it gets me writing and keeps me focused and responsible. If there are any new writers looking to make a few dollars, the site is called Textbroker. You can sign up and they will ask you for a writing sample. Once reviewed, you will get a star rating. The higher the stars, the more you get paid. Easy-peasy.

By the way, today is my fifth anniversary with WordPress! How the time flies.

Have an awesome IWSG day!! 

A RIVER IN DARKNESS-ONE MAN’S ESCAPE FROM NORTH KOREA

OMG, fellow bloggers, when was the last time you saw a Monday Book Review? A long time now. I may not keep to the Monday schedule yet, but I’ll try keeping my reviews regular.  I have a long list of books I’ve read in the past year that I haven’t been able to review, so I’m mixing them up with books that I’m reading and are on my TBR. Today I’ll be reviewing A River in Darkness-One Man’s Escape from North Korea.

 

BOOK:  A River in Darkness-One Man’s Escape from North Korea

AUTHOR: Masaji Ishikawa

GENRE: Memoir

RATING: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥/♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

5/5 HEARTS

BOOK BLURB:
Half-Korean, half-Japanese, Masaji Ishikawa has spent his whole life feeling like a man without a country. This feeling only deepened when his family moved from Japan to North Korea when Ishikawa was just thirteen years old, and unwittingly became members of the lowest social caste. His father, himself a Korean national, was lured to the new Communist country by promises of abundant work, education for his children, and a higher station in society. But the reality of their new life was far from utopian.

In this memoir translated from the original Japanese, Ishikawa candidly recounts his tumultuous upbringing and the brutal thirty-six years he spent living under a crushing totalitarian regime, as well as the challenges he faced repatriating to Japan after barely escaping North Korea with his life. A River in Darkness is not only a shocking portrait of life inside the country but a testament to the dignity—and indomitable nature—of the human spirit

MY REVIEW:

In a word, heartbreaking. Mr. Ishikawa takes us through his life in North Korea over a thirty some odd year period, from his move from Japan to North Korea with his abusive father and mother to his final escape. After being placed in the lowest social caste, the family found employment nearly impossible. It was worse for his mother because of her Japanese heritage.

From his failed marriage to his children, it felt like the blows kept hitting me in the chest. We think we have a good understanding of the strife in North Korea but we aren’t even close. Mr. Ishikawa explains how many times his family was near starvation and the treatment they received from military personnel.

After discussing his escape plans with his family, he promised to get them out. The most heart-pounding scenes in the book were when he actually made his escape. I won’t give away any spoilers but I’ll admit that I nearly cried at the end.

I loved the writing style and couldn’t put the book down.  It was translated from its original Japanese which I thought would be a problem, but it wasn’t. You may not want to read this if you’re overly sensitive (guilty) but I highly recommend this book.

RATING: ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥/♥ ♥ ♥ ♥ ♥

5/5 HEARTS

 

 

 

#IWSG – Looking Back

Hello all! It’s the first Wednesday of the month and we know what that means:

IWSG-badgeIt’s time for another meeting of the Insecure Writers Support Group – #IWSG.

My hero, the amazing Ninja Captain Alex J. Cavanaugh founded this group and it has become a safe haven if you are an insecure writer.

Click the image if you would like to be a part of the #IWSG family. You won’t regret it.

Purpose: To share and encourage. Writers can express doubts and concerns without fear of appearing foolish or weak.

 

 

The awesome co-hosts of the December 6 posting of the IWSG are Julie Flanders, Shannon Lawrence, Fundy Blue, and Heather Gardner!

 

December 6 question – As you look back on 2017, with all its successes/failures, if you could backtrack, what would you do differently?
 
Where would I even begin? 2017 had a mix of everything for me although little had to do with writing. That makes me sad. Don’t get me wrong; I’ve come up with a lot of new ideas that I’d like to put to paper, but it never seemed to happen. If it wasn’t my health, it was something else.
 
If I could backtrack, I suppose I’d have done more to push myself in all areas of my life. I would’ve gotten more involved in taking care of my own health, rather than assuming the doctors had it all right. I would’ve gotten my depression under control a lot sooner and thereby giving my writing more of a shot. Unfortunately, that’s the woulda, shoulda, and couldas, and I’m not going there.
 
I’m going to try really hard to make next year better in all aspects.
 
What would you have done differently if you could backtrack?

 

 

 

WELCOME ME BACK!!

Hey there my beloved blogger friends! Hope all is well with you guys. I’ve been gone for several months due to an unexpectedly accidental computer mishap, among other things. But I’m back. Again. <Rolling eyes> Let’s see if I can keep up with you guys this time.

I’d be remiss not to put out there how much I’ve missed blogging and my blogging friends. I hope I haven’t lost too many of you in my absence. I just wanted you all to know that I’m OK.   XOXOXO

 

48 Hour Film Making

DWYER PRODUCTIONS

It may sound crazy, but making a short film in 48 hours can be done! In fact, there is a competition in New Zealand called the 48 hour film festival, which I have done a couple of times and I’m here to give you a few tips. Whether you’re going to compete or just do it for fun, read on!

  1. GETTING THE TEAM TOGETHER

Making a film in such a short amount of time requires real commitment, it’s full of late nights, long hours and not much sleep. So before you get stuck into it, make sure everyone in your team is 100% ready for the next 48 hours. Here’s what happened to my team my second attempt at this;

First things first, we didn’t have a particularly large group to begin with, but when someone (who happens to own the camera) drops out the NIGHT before, it’s not ideal…

View original post 465 more words